from the "Guide to the High Life" issue of the City Paper to accompany my "Baltimore bands to smoke to" list: A mix with a song from each band, sequenced by me. Tell me if this one “works.”

  1. Labtekwon - “Listen”
  2. lzz kng, “Shmoke Wiidutch”
  3. Abdu Ali, “Mary”
  4. Natural Velvet, “Dark Inertia”
  5. Flying Eyes, “Long Gone”
  6. Foghound, “Gotta Go”
  7. Jenny Graf, “The Future is a Faded Song”
  8. Lafayette Gilchrist & the New Volcanoes, “The Fast Con”
  9. OG Dutch Master, “Dimez”
  10. Zomes, “Cave Mountain Stream”

Q
why do all dudes love jodorowsky so much?
A

They don’t? Haha, this is a very too much time on the Internet question! I think Jodorowsky love though mostly comes from the things he “codes” or looks to be espousing when really he isn’t: trippy, mystical, dark shit, etc. Which I think his work is parsing or outright mocking most of the time. He’s like Wes Anderson: He’s got a lot of fans who see him as a lifestyle filmmaker when he’s pretty much making movies deconstructing the lifestyle they think he’s riding hard for, you know?


Q
I'm trying to get Bjork albums and don't know which to get, tell me the Top 3?
Anonymous
A
  • Post
  • Homogenic
  • Selma Songs

Q
Do you just get a kick out of Jodorowsky because of how unique, visionary and out there he is, or do you find it possible to take his mysticism seriously in some way?
Anonymous
A

I mean, he’s having a lot of fun for sure, but I take his mysticism pretty seriously. Namely, his presentation of all that stuff though is that it’s kind of  useful only temporarily and like, part of the journey/experience, which is the point. He’s using “film” the way people use acid: a shortcut to insight and inpiration. A way to get there without say, meditating for decades, etc.

Often in life, you begin and end in the same place but you gain experience and insight by doing that circle. Think of how Holy Mountain is ultimately, an anti-mystical movie. All of its amazing, creative, inspiring artifice gets slowly stripped away once they actually go outside to climb the mountain until you’re left with close to nothing (because in the end, it’s highlighted as a false thing, just “a film”). And so, you essentially went “nowhere,” but you experienced so much in the two hours that it will inform you once you leave the theatre, live life, etc. All of its visionary-ness is ultimately useless compared to you know, going outside, hanging out with the person you love, and all that good stuff.

Seeing Holy Mountain was definitely one of those life-changing experiences for me. It definitely got me tapped back into using my imagination and creativity and I think it all worked for me on a level beyond “woah, looks cool,” because Jodorowsky’s fun spirit and brutal realism hovers around the edges of the movie (it’s a very gritty movie even at its most trippy) and so, it felt earned and lived in, you know? I could go along for the ride because it wasn’t really about escapism in the end. It was about getting to insight by any means necessary.

I mean, isn’t his attempt at Dune the ultimate example of this momentary existing? Where process became more important than final product! Dune even incomplete lead to Hollywood product like Star Wars, Alien, and Lynch’s Dune and endlessly inspired creative types doing “artier” things to this day and all of Jodorowksy’s post-Dune creative work (especially his comics which are INCREDIBLE) begins with the ideas he was developing there while making Dune, which I suspect, he never expected to actually complete. So, even his huckster qualities, etc. is just him living in the moment, being temporal, which is kind of the only way to live really. Not because it’s the “right” way to live but because everything is unpredictable and chaotic and you have no control over anything and could die at any moment, so process and the moment have to matter a whole lot, you know?


Q
dude, you seem to have it so together. how do you do that?
Anonymous
A

I don’t know man, I’m just a real Type A personality go-getter type super motivated bro, you feel me


Q
Shamaneater piece was great, Top 5 PS2 games?
Anonymous
A

Thanks guy that record! Worth it: Cex, Shamaneater.

Um, my video game knowledge post SNES/Sega is weak but…

  • Katamari Damacy
  • Katamari Damacy
  • Katamari Damacy
  • Batman: Vengeance
  • Grand Theft Auto: Vice City

This week’s Baltimore City Paper is THE W E E D ISSUE (cover art by Charlie Herrick) because of you know, 4/20 and hey, decriminalization which is kind of a big deal here (baby steps towards legalization guys, baby steps).Check out the entire "Guide to the High Life" because there’s lots to read including a Mom’s perspective on talking to her teen about smoking, a celebration of smoking up and going to the museum, and lots more. I helped with all of the music stuff which includes:
Me writing about being stoned and walking my dog and listening to Ricky Eat Acid’s Three Love Songs
A list of the ten most being blunted-friendly bands in Baltimore (with a playlist) including Abdu Ali, Natural Velvet, lzz kng, and more.
A weed-themed Baltimore Club mix that DJ James Nasty was nice enough to put together.

This week’s Baltimore City Paper is THE W E E D ISSUE (cover art by Charlie Herrick) because of you know, 4/20 and hey, decriminalization which is kind of a big deal here (baby steps towards legalization guys, baby steps).Check out the entire "Guide to the High Life" because there’s lots to read including a Mom’s perspective on talking to her teen about smoking, a celebration of smoking up and going to the museum, and lots more. I helped with all of the music stuff which includes:


Q
Can you recommend some songs where Lil Wayne displays his skills as a technical MC?
Anonymous
A

MOST OF THEM? What kind of question is this? Seems loaded. Tha Carter is probably his most sturdy and pen-and-pad technical in my opinion, but all of his unhinged mid-2000s freestyles clearly build on top of conventional “skills” and then doo-doo all over “skillz.”


Q
As a "Young Writer," there is nothing worse than submitting something that goes up with very light editing. You want to blame the editor, BUUUUUUUT then you remember you're the one that put the words on the page. Anyways nice post.
A

Very smart and very humble David Turner, everybody.